Practice

Issues

Practice

Rather than considering practice and research as unique, Community Psychologists understand that these processes inform each other. As such, both are necessary to better the human condition. Community Psychologists as well as the Practice Council within SCRA actively work to connect with community practitioners in community psychology, community development, public health and other areas.

photograph of youth sitting at a table

Creating Spaces for Young People to Collaborate

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Coalition Building | Tags:
Youth need support and guidance from skilled facilitators and adult facilitators need opportunities to engage in ongoing learning with their peers.

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Living Community Psychology-Judi Aubel

Posted in: Inspiration | Tags:
Published in:
Judi Aubel’s current focus is on providing grandmothers with opportunities for empowerment, viewing them as an invaluable asset, or resource, as agents of positive cultural change.

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Safe, Secure, and Loved: Parent Education

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families | Tags: ,
Published in:
Community-led parent education focused on managing parenting stress, clarifying parenting goals, and strengthening nurturing parenting can engage and mobilize a volunteer community workforce.

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Demystifying Decolonialization: A Practical Example from the Classroom

Posted in: Marginalized Groups | Tags:
Published in:
Decolonization is a process of examining and undoing unearned privilege resulting from historical and present day injustice. As a process, decolonization can push students from apathy to develop a sense of activism.

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Letting Go: Why It’s So Hard to Say Goodbye (to our interventions)

Posted in: Prevention Science | Tags: ,
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McKay and colleagues identify criteria to decide whether to de-implement an intervention and provide structure for how that de-implementation can happen.

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Embodiment as Self-Care in Activist Movements

Posted in: Coalition Building, Mental Health, Self Help | Tags:
Embodied practice invites people to become informed by their bodies, attuned to their physical needs and experiences, and accepting of their natural selves.

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Don’t Forget the Outputs: The Importance of Outputs in Communicating Evaluation Plans

Posted in: Blog | Tags:
Author:
Hi! I’m Tara Gregory, Director of the Center for Applied Research and Evaluation (CARE) at Wichita State University. Like any evaluator, the staff of CARE are frequently tasked with figuring out what difference programs are making for those they serve. So, we tend to be really focused on outcomes and see outputs as the relatively easy […]

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Competencias del Psicólogo Comunitario

Posted in: Blog | Tags: ,
Author:
Re-published with author’s permission in e-voluntas De la aplicación de programas a las iniciativas de base comunitaria La revista Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice (GJCPP) dedica el volumen 7 (4) a debatir sobre las 18 competencias para la práctica profesional de la psicología comunitaria propuestas por la Sociedad para la Investigación y la Acción Comunitarias (SCRA) en 2012. Las 18 competencias del […]

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Incorporating an Equity and Justice Perspective into Coalition and Collaborative Evaluation

Posted in: Blog | Tags:
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Our names are Susan M. Wolfe and Kyrah K. Brown and we are consultants at CNM Connect where we provide evaluation and capacity building services to nonprofit organizations.  Our work also includes evaluating community collaborations and coalitions. To effectively address most health, education, and other social issues at a systems level requires that communities address inequity and injustice. RAD RESOURCE: In January, […]

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Unintended Consequences of Community Partnerships

Posted in: Coalition Building, Education, Sense of Community | Tags:
Good intentions are never enough. Sometimes, there are unintended consequences of our community partnerships.

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