American Journal of Community Psychology

Issues

American Journal of Community Psychology

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Is Community Psychology “Forever Young”? Noting and Addressing the Lack of Community Psychologists in Communities of Aging

Posted in: Aging, History of Community Psychology | Tags:
Published in:
Between the years 2005 to 2050, the global population of older persons (over age 65) is expected to increase 113%. In continents such as Asia and Africa, the increase is expected to exceed 268% and 307%, respectively. Considering women constitute a majority of the aging population, they may be at an even greater disadvantage than […]

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Incarceration of Undocumented Families: A Policy Statement by the Society for Community Research and Action: Division 27 of the American Psychological Association

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Criminal Justice, Public Policy
Published in:
Jessica Chicco, Patricia Esparza, M. Brinton Lykes, Fabricio E. Balcazar and Kevin Ferreira On April 5th Antonio Puente, President of the APA, sent a letter to the Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security raising concerns about the current policies regarding the incarceration of migrant families. That letter was based largely on the SCRA Statement. EXECUTIVE […]

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Natural Mentoring is Good for ALL Youth

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Mental Health | Tags:
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Ashley Simons-Rudolph Mentoring adolescents is an important way in which communities seek to promote prosocial behavior among youth. Mentoring programs address a number of social issues including encouraging youth to finish high school, break the cycle of poverty, and avoid or delay drug and alcohol use. Perhaps the best-known mentorship strategies are formalized relationships initiated […]

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How We Can Promote “Citizenship” in Communities

Posted in: Marginalized Groups, Mental Health, Public Policy | Tags: ,
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If we return to the definition of citizenship as a sense of belonging to a group, we gain an understanding of “community” as more broad than simple geographical proximity, membership, or identification with a group.

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The Effects of Deportation on Families and Communities

Posted in: Aging, Children, Youth and Families, Marginalized Groups, Public Policy | Tags:
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Deportation has numerous detrimental impacts on individuals who are deported, and on the families and communities they are forced to leave behind. This policy statement reviews the empirical literature to describe the effects of deportation on the individual, families, and the broader community, in order to inform policy and practice recommendations.

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Community-Based Research With Urban American Indians

Posted in: Marginalized Groups | Tags:
Published in:
Hartmann, W. E., Wendt, D. C., Saftner, M. D., Marcus, J. D., & Momper, S. M. “Why is it important to learn about urban American Indian communities as well as reservation communities?“ Despite the 1976 Indian Health Care Improvement Act, physical and mental health disparities exist in many American Indian (AI) populations. Approximately 70% of […]

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Family Detention of Undocumented Immigrants: We Can Do Better

Posted in: Marginalized Groups, Public Policy
Published in:
a summary of the Incarceration of Undocumented Families: A Policy Statement by the Society for Community Research and Action: Division 27 of the American Psychological Association  from Rachel Storace “The current U.S. immigration policies and their enforcement have detrimental effects on migrant adults, children, families, and communities” In March of 2016, the Society for Community Research and […]

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What is Swampscott and Why is it Important?

Posted in: History of Community Psychology
Published in:
“It was an exciting time… They [Swampscott conference participants] wanted to intervene in social problems that were not explicitly mental health in nature, and that’s why they talked about becoming “social change agents” – a vision that was a sea change for American psychology.”

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How Keeping Up With the Joneses (or at least living next door) Can Be Good for Your Health

Posted in: Poverty and Socioeconomic Status | Tags:
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Can the income-level of the people we share our neighborhoods with affect our health? Does the income-level of our neighbors shape how we perceive our own social status?

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Enhancing Social Responsibility and Prosocial Leadership to Prevent Aggression, Peer Victimization, and Emotional Problems in Elementary School Children

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Education, Violence Prevention | Tags:
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The researchers evaluate the WITS Program (Walk Away, Ignore, Talk it Out, Seek Help), which provides student, parents, and school administrators a common language to encourage prosocial behavior.

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