American Journal of Community Psychology

Issues

American Journal of Community Psychology

Drawing of a woman on a cellular phone

Why chatting with your best friend about how much fun you had at the party is good for you and your community’s health

Posted in: Prevention Science, Sense of Community | Tags:
Published in:
It is intuitive that social support and positive interactions within communities are linked to better physical and emotional health for individual community members. However, we have not be able to say, from a research standpoint, how or why this is the case. In Sharing Positive Experiences Boosts Resilient Thinking: Everyday Benefits of Social Connection and […]

Read More

Is it Any of Our Business? How Religious Leaders Understand and Respond to IPV

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Criminal Justice | Tags:
Published in:
What is the role of a spiritual leader in the private sphere of the home? How do church leaders address the tensions between reducing the rate of divorce, promoting family stability, and addressing the needs of church members at risk for emotional, financial, and physical violence within their families? The “holy hush” refers to a […]

Read More
Photograph of urban housing

How Does Exposure to Violence During Adolescence Impact Future Orientation?

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Mental Health | Tags:
Published in:
Exposure to violence (ETV) is associated with poorer mental and physical health outcomes including mental distress, suicidal ideation, problematic behaviors, and substance abuse. Individuals with regular exposure to violence may be at higher risk of hopelessness and more likely to avoid consideration of the future in a positive way. Up to now, we haven’t known […]

Read More
Photograph of a woman in a field

Letting Go: Why It’s So Hard to Say Goodbye (to our interventions)

Posted in: Prevention Science | Tags:
Published in:
Nothing lasts forever. De-implementation is the process by which health promotion and prevention-oriented interventions end. How do you know when it is the right time to say sayonara? It can be hard to know when a trusted intervention has run its course. McKay and colleagues identify criteria to decide whether to de-implement and provide structure […]

Read More
icon of people holding hands

Sense of Community: Let’s Build it Together!

Posted in: Sense of Community
Published in:
Immigration policy is debated around the globe. Xenophobia abounds. Yet, one of every 30 people live outside of their country of birth. Immigrants and longer-term residents often transform their sense of community—their feelings of belonging and mattering to the community, and beliefs that they will meet their needs through the community—in the new communities they […]

Read More
Photograph of a younger woman reading with an older woman

Is Community Psychology “Forever Young”? Noting and Addressing the Lack of Community Psychologists in Communities of Aging

Posted in: Aging, History of Community Psychology
Published in:
Between the years 2005 to 2050, the global population of older persons (over age 65) is expected to increase 113%. In continents such as Asia and Africa, the increase is expected to exceed 268% and 307%, respectively. Considering women constitute a majority of the aging population, they may be at an even greater disadvantage than […]

Read More
Photograph of hands on a gate

Incarceration of Undocumented Families: A Policy Statement by the Society for Community Research and Action: Division 27 of the American Psychological Association

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Criminal Justice, Public Policy
Published in:
Jessica Chicco, Patricia Esparza, M. Brinton Lykes, Fabricio E. Balcazar and Kevin Ferreira On April 5th Antonio Puente, President of the APA, sent a letter to the Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security raising concerns about the current policies regarding the incarceration of migrant families. That letter was based largely on the SCRA Statement. EXECUTIVE […]

Read More
Photograph of a youth and his coach

Natural Mentoring is Good for ALL Youth

Posted in: Children, Youth and Families, Mental Health | Tags:
Published in:
Ashley Simons-Rudolph Mentoring adolescents is an important way in which communities seek to promote prosocial behavior among youth. Mentoring programs address a number of social issues including encouraging youth to finish high school, break the cycle of poverty, and avoid or delay drug and alcohol use. Perhaps the best-known mentorship strategies are formalized relationships initiated […]

Read More

How We Can Promote “Citizenship” in Communities

Posted in: Marginalized Groups, Mental Health, Public Policy | Tags: ,
Published in:
If we return to the definition of citizenship as a sense of belonging to a group, we gain an understanding of “community” as more broad than simple geographical proximity, membership, or identification with a group.

Read More

The Effects of Deportation on Families and Communities

Posted in: Aging, Children, Youth and Families, Criminal Justice, Marginalized Groups, Public Policy | Tags:
Published in:
The Effects of Deportation on Families and Communities A Policy Statement by the Society for Community Research and Action: Division 27 of the American Psychological Association[1] Prepared by: Regina Day Langhout, University of California at Santa Cruz, Sara L. Buckingham, University of Alaska at Anchorage, Ashmeet Kaur Oberoi, University of Miami, Noé Rubén Chávez, City […]

Read More